stories of revolution by love of neighbor

Archive for the ‘Love’ Category

2012: The End or a New Beginning?

I recently had a dream in which I was explaining to someone that the so-called “end of the world” actually gives me substantial hope for the future. I am not some fatalist who wishes for the end of the world just to be done with it all. Quite the opposite, in fact. I’m a happy-go-lucky optimist who looks at life though rose-colored glasses.

What I refer to that gives me hope is an interpretation of the Mayan calendar which I have heard is the most accurate interpretation. What this particular interpretation gets at is that 2012 is not the end of the world, but simply a new beginning; it is to be a moment of transformation and rejuvenation for the Earth and all in it, and that is what gives me hope for the future, because what the world needs now more than ever is transformation. Sometimes what I really think we need is just to press some sort of reset button. (more…)

Lessons Learned in My First Year

This was originally posted to In Our Words, and goes out to everyone doing or considering international service.

On September 5, I celebrated a full year of my service in Colombia. Just shy of a year ago, I left my family, my friends, my home, my native tongue, and many other aspects of my life in the U.S. to live and work in Bogota, Colombia. Initially, I had no idea what I was getting myself into, but along the way, I’ve made some important discoveries and realizations about myself and international service. (more…)

Moving Towards the Margins at GC

It was just like any other early May morning in Tampa, hot and muggy. The General Conference of The United Methodist Church, the main decision-making body of The UMC, would soon be coming to a close. We knew that it was the big day, the day that whether or not The UMC would agree to disagree on human sexuality would be on the table.

No legislation had made it out of committee to be passed on to the main body, but in one last-ditch attempt to salvage the dignity of queer folks, a replacement was proposed. While effectively stating that The UMC agrees to disagree on human sexuality, the compromise offered was less than satisfactory in some regards, but the legislative strategists among us knew that it was likely our only chance to remove the statement that “The United Methodist Church does not condone the practice of homosexuality and considers it incompatible with Christian teaching.” (more…)

You Can’t Stop the Beat: Bringing Change to The UMC

This was originally posted at In Our Words, a blog a friend of mine from DePaul started. As it is part of my reflections on General Conference, I have decided to re-post it here with a few edits so those who do not follow IOW or who didn’t see my facebook posts of this article could know a little more about my activities at and reflections on General Conference.

Dancers from the flash mob
Photo from UMCOM GC Photostream

For the last week of April and the first week of May, I spent my time in Tampa, FL. No, it wasn’t some sort of Girls Gone Wild-esque Spring Break misadventure. Instead, it was a misadventure of much more epic proportions, or so it felt at times. It was the General Conference of The United Methodist Church, or, more simply, a conference of 1,000 United Methodists from across the world coming together to talk about the structure, management, and social stances of The UMC for the next four years. (more…)

Martyrs for Love

For me right now, Valentine’s Day could have easily passed by without my batting an eyelash. Colombia (thank goodness) has not caved to the consumerism of the holiday. When I saw the notifications that all of my friends were talking about Valentine’s Day on Facebook for the past few days, I decided to not let it bring me down; I would reclaim the day. I began by reclaiming the day as Singles’ Self-Empowerment Day, because I’m not fond of the idea of Singles’ Awareness Day; that just seems depressing and like it continues placing coupled people on some sort of pedestal. Of course, it’s also the birthday of Anna Howard Shaw, so it is already reclaimed as a feminist holiday. But this morning, I saw that a friend had posted the following, a history of St. Valentine: (more…)

Convirtiendo en una Prima // Becoming a Cousin

Whoops, I haven’t blogged for a month and a half. I guess time really does fly when you’re having fun. But also, other than my travels around  Colombia during the holidays and going back to work, I really don’t have much to report on. So I guess I’ll share some reflections on one of the lessons I’ve learned over these holiday travels, and maybe I’ll be better about getting back into the habit of regular blogging.

Family. It’s an incredibly complex concept, one holding different meaning for each and every person, a concept that psychologists and sociologists and anthropologists spend their fair share of time trying to reach some sort of understanding about. Growing up as the daughter of two United Methodist pastors, I  learned from a young age the importance and meaning of chosen family (my first set of chosen grandparents were in the town we moved away from when I was two years old, so I’m not sure whether they were assigned or chosen, but they were significant nonetheless).  But I think that since I  moved to Colombia, alone, as a single young woman whose biological family is thousands of miles away, family has taken on a whole different meaning for me. (more…)

Building “hailpeople”

On Tuesday, it poured hail. I’m not joking or exaggerating; if you imagine a massive downpour and then change the raindrops to pieces (balls? bits? I don’t even know the correct terminology) of hail, you get a perfect picture of what happened. Little pellets of ice were pouring from the sky. One coworker joked that it was the beginning of the end of the world; the precursor to what’s supposed to happen next year: 2012.

I was entranced; never before in my life do I recall having seen hail, and definitely not of this epic proportion. Guess I got my Colombian Snowpocalypse after all (only this one was Hailpocalypse). There was, to all intents and purposes, a literal river of melted hail flowing down the street in front of work, and the unmelted hail covered the ground, at a distance looking like a blanket of snow. To me it was a fascinatingly and somewhat hauntingly beautiful sight. (more…)